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An unusual pair of early George III Butter Shells made by the Royal silversmith, Thomas Heming, in London in 1767.

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154145
Width
5 cm (1 1/1")
Depth
5 cm (1 1/1")
The Shells are of an unusual design and stand on two cast detailed winkle feet and the main body is modelled to simulate a scallop shell. The cast carrying handle is modelled as a horizontal scroll and the main body is engraved with a contemporary Scottish Crest with the Motto Nobilis Ira and Coronet above. The Crest is that as used by the ancient family of Stuart of Scotland. Thomas Heming was appointed Principal Goldsmith to King George III in 1760, an appointment which he held until 1782. He had workshops in New Bond Street when these Shells were made. Some of his earlier surviving pieces, in the Royal Collection, show a delicacy of taste and refinement of execution, which was unquestionably inherited from his Master Peter Archambo. His Masterpiece is probably the Speakers Wine Cistern, of 1770, at Belton House, Lincolnshire.
Width
5 cm (1 1/1")
Depth
5 cm (1 1/1")
Year
1767